context

Why CC&C tackles pancreatic cancer

Tackle “unmet needs”

Our technology can be applied to all solid cancers. But some cancers are now properly cared for when others are particularly lethal, like cancer of the pancreas: In the US in 2016, 52,000 new cases and 42,000 deaths.

Facilitate the use of surgery

Today, surgery is rarely possible, in less than 10% of the patients. Moreover, this pathology is constantly increasing, and if nothing is done, it will be the second cause of cancer mortality in 2030. It is therefore urgent to propose solutions to these patients.

Our method applies to non-metastatic non-operable tumors, which represents 4,000 patients per year in France and 16,000 in the USA.

In the medium term, we plan to apply our method to other “unmet needs” tumors such as glioblastoma, or liver cancer that is very common in Asia.

Physical Oncology

A brief panorama, in video, of the progress of the discipline

Consult our scientific Bibliography on the subject.

“In oncology, tissular phenotype is dominant towards cellular genotype”

Mina Bissell, 2012

principles

Direct action on the cellular tissue

Our method can be described as follows: magnetic particles are incorporated into the neoangiogenesis network surrounding the tumor. A magnetic field gradient is imposed on the whole tumor and neovessels containing the particles. Nanoparticles act as « bioactuators», transforming magnetic energy into mechanical energy. The nanoparticles impose a stress field on the tumor.

A short- and medium-term strategy

As a first step, we aim to reduce the volume of tumors, to make them operable and, secondly, to prove that the normal tissue architecture can be re-established and the cancer process reversed.
For more details, consult our Patent.

 

Focus on the two technologies at stake

Superconducting magnets

Electromagnetic field technology, electrotechnology, is a field of engineering science mastered for a long time, and used in many fields such as energy production and transport, telecommunications, medical imaging. The proposed device is close to an MRI in design, volume, and cost of production. Intensive magnetic field gradients have already been used in many Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) patients since the 1960s. Our feasibility study (2011) showed the possibility of obtaining the very intense magnetic field gradients we need to reach a deep organ like the pancreas.

The change of scale from rodent to human, that is to say from a few centimeters to a few tens of centimeters, will require the use of superconducting magnets. This technology is widely used and deployed particularly in Medical Imaging, with MRI. The processing of the mouse experiment data will greatly accelerate the modeling of the human prototype.

Ferric nanoparticles

We use ferric nanoparticles carrying αVβ3 integrin ligands, this protein being overexpressed in the activated endothelial cells of the tumor neovasculature. Particles of this type are available for injection in animals, as a MRI contrast medium. Their toxicity is thus a priori known and minimal.

Frequently Asked Questions

To fully understand our technology, we must not fall into the following traps:

It is not a magnetic action on the tumor It's a set of forces/pressure (a field) exerted on the tumor
It is not a system for heating nanoparticles It's an use of nanoparticles to transform magnetic energy into mechanical energy in contact with the tumor
It is not the improvement of an already existing method It's indeed a disruptive innovation, a paradigm shift, as immunotherapy was a few years ago
This is not an action on the genome of each of the cancer cells It's an action on the environment of the cancerous tissue
It is not a method of destroying all cancer cells up to the last It's a means of controlling tumor growth, or even reversing it for a return to normal tissue architecture and function
It's not a molecule, it's not a drug It's a combination of two medical devices
It's not biology or chemistry It's physics

our advances

Our latest scientific news

Proof of efficacy for dummies

Proof of efficacy for dummies

This article is for curious but unscientific readers. Expert readers will find a description of the planned protocol within the NanoStress consortium here. For 2 years, we have announced everywhere that to obtain our Proof of Efficacy will mark the...

read more
A joint experiment between CC&C and the IBDM

A joint experiment between CC&C and the IBDM

- Mechanical Signals and Cancer: a new experiment on colon cancer. First results expected early 2019. Based in Marseille, the IBDM brings together about twenty research teams that explore the field of developmental biology and associated pathologies, with daily...

read more
20 months of extra life for pancreatic cancer patients

20 months of extra life for pancreatic cancer patients

In Chicago, on June 4th, was held the annual conference of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), during which an interesting communication was made. The news comes from France, more precisely from Nancy. Already three years ago, the team of the Cancer...

read more

bibliography

Our scientific publications

Our Proof of Concept : Mechanical Signals Inhibit Growth of a Grafted Tumor In Vivo: Proof of Concept (PlosOne 2016)

Read the article

Communication at the American Association for Cancer Research (2017)

Read the abstract

Presentation poster of our Innovation (2016)

Watch the poster

Rémy Brossel’s book
Forces & Cancer – From Biology to Physics, from the Laboratory to the Patient
42 pages, free download

Download the book

Scientific Bibliography in Physical Oncology

For beginners

The basic principles: : Ted Talks by Mina Bissel (2012)

Video

The Wikipedia article on “Physical Oncology
(we wrote it…)

Article

A good introductory article by Erika Jonietz in Nature (for a fee)

Article

A fairly comprehensive presentation on the relationship between Physical Sciences and Oncology on the AACR site

Folder

Literature

   The link between the ECM and the nucleus

Wang N, Tytell JD, & Ingber DE
Mechanotransduction at a distance: mechanically coupling the extracellular matrix with the nucleus.
Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology volume 10, 75–82 (2009)
nature.com

   In Vitro

Matthew J Paszek, Nastaran Zahir, Kandice R Johnson et al.
Tensional homeostasis and the malignant phenotype
Cancer Cell 2005, 8; 241-254
sciencedirect.com

Montel F, et al.
Stress clamp experiments on multicellular tumor spheroids.
Phys Rev Lett 107(18): 188102. (2011)
journals.aps.org

G Cheng et al.
Micro-Environnental Mechanical Stress Controls Tumor Spheroid Size and Morphology by Suppressing Proliferation and Inducing Apoptosis in Cancer Cells.
PloS One 4(2) (2009)
journals.plos.org

   Ex Vivo

Plodinec M, et al.
The nanomechanical signature of breast cancer.
Nat Nanotechnol 7(11): 757-765. (2012)
nature.com

   Thermodynamics

EJ Mah, AF Yee, MA Digman
Metabolism Modulation of Cancer Cells on Varying Substrate Stiffnesses
Biophysical Journal, 2018
cell.com

   Reversion

Benjamin L Ricca et al
Transient external force induces phenotypic reversion of malignant epithelial structures via nitric oxide signaling
eLife, 2018
elifesciences.org

   Interactions with genetics

J Werfel et al.
How Changes in Extracellullar Matrix Mechanics and Gene Expression Variability Might Combine to Drive Cancer Progression.
Plos One 8 (10) e76122 (2013)
journals.plos.org

   Synergy with Immunotherapy

Ayako Miyazawa et al.
Regulation of PD-L1 expression by matrix stiffness in lung cancer cells
Biochemical and biophysical research communications 495.3 (2018): 2344-2349.
sciencedirect.com

CELL CONTRAINT & CANCER
le Mas l’Hermite
331 chemin de la Poterie
f13280 Raphèle les Arles

Why CC&C tackles pancreatic cancer

Tackle “unmet needs”

 

Our technology can be applied to all solid cancers. But some cancers are now properly cared for when others are particularly lethal, like cancer of the pancreas : in the US in 2016, 52,000 new cases and 42,000 deaths.

Facilitate the use of surgery

Today, surgery is rarely possible, in less than 10% of the patients. Moreover, this pathology is constantly increasing, and if nothing is done, it will be the second cause of cancer mortality in 2030. It is therefore urgent to propose solutions to these patients.

Our method applies to non-metastatic non-operable tumors, which represents 4,000 patients per year in France and 16,000 in the USA.

In the medium term, we plan to apply our method to other “unmet needs” tumors such as glioblastoma, or liver cancer that is very common in Asia.

Physical Oncology

A brief panorama, in video, of the progress of the discipline

Consult our scientific Bibliography on the subject.

“In oncology, tissular phenotype is dominant towards cellular genotype.”

Mina Bissell, 2012

Direct action on the cellular tissue

Our method can be described as follows: magnetic particles are incorporated into the neoangiogenesis network surrounding the tumor. A magnetic field gradient is imposed on the whole tumor and neovessels containing the particles. Nanoparticles act as «bioactuators», transforming magnetic energy into mechanical energy. The nanoparticles impose a stress field on the tumor.

A short- and medium-term strategy

As a first step, we aim to reduce the volume of tumors, to make them operable and, secondly, to prove that the normal tissue architecture can be re-established and the cancer process reversed.
For more details, consult our Patent.

Focus on the two technologies at stake

Superconducting magnets

Electromagnetic field technology, electrotechnology, is a field of engineering science mastered for a long time, and used in many fields such as energy production and transport, telecommunications, medical imaging. The proposed device is close to an MRI in design, volume, and cost of production. Intensive magnetic field gradients have already been used in many Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) patients since the 1960s. Our feasibility study (2011) showed the possibility of obtaining the very intense magnetic field gradients we need to reach a deep organ like the pancreas.

The change of scale from rodent to human, that is to say from a few centimeters to a few tens of centimeters, will require the use of superconducting magnets. This technology is widely used and deployed particularly in Medical Imaging, with MRI. The processing of the mouse experiment data will greatly accelerate the modeling of the human prototype.

Ferric nanoparticles

We use ferric nanoparticles carrying αVβ3 integrin ligands, this protein being overexpressed in the activated endothelial cells of the tumor neovasculature. Particles of this type are available for injection in animals. They were also used ias a MRI contrast medium. Their toxicity is thus a priori known and minimal.

Frequently Asked Questions

To fully understand our technology, we must not fall into the following traps:

It is not a magnetic action on the tumor

It is not a system for heating nanoparticles

It is not the improvement of an already existing method

This is not an action on the genome of each of the cancer cells

It is not a method of destroying all cancer cells up to the last

It’s not a molecule, it’s not a drug

It’s not biology or chemistry

It’s a set of forces/pressure (a field) exerted on the tumor

It’s an use of nanoparticles to transform magnetic energy into mechanical energy in contact with the tumor

It’s indeed a disruptive innovation, a paradigm shift, as immunotherapy was a few years ago

it’s an action on the environment of the cancerous tissue

It’s a means of controlling tumor growth, or even reversing it for a return to normal tissue architecture and function

It’s a combination of two medical devices

It’s physics

Our latest scientific news

Proof of efficacy for dummies

This article is for curious but unscientific readers. Expert readers will find a description of the planned protocol within the NanoStress consortium here. For 2 years, we have announced everywhere that to obtain our Proof of Efficacy will mark the...

read more

A joint experiment between CC&C and the IBDM

- Mechanical Signals and Cancer: a new experiment on colon cancer. First results expected early 2019. Based in Marseille, the IBDM brings together about twenty research teams that explore the field of developmental biology and associated pathologies, with daily...

read more

20 months of extra life for pancreatic cancer patients

In Chicago, on June 4th, was held the annual conference of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), during which an interesting communication was made. The news comes from France, more precisely from Nancy. Already three years ago, the team of the Cancer...

read more

Our scientific publications

Our Proof of Concept : Mechanical Signals Inhibit Growth of a Grafted Tumor In Vivo: Proof of Concept (PlosOne 2016)

Read the article

Communication at the American Association for Cancer Research (2017)

Read the abstract

Presentation poster of our Innovation (2016)

Watch the poster

Rémy Brossel’s book
Forces & Cancer – From Biology to Physics, from the Laboratory to the Patient
42 pages, free download

Download the book

Scientific Bibliography in Physical Oncology

For beginners

The basic principles: : Ted Talks by Mina Bissel (2012)

Video

The Wikipedia article on “Physical Oncology

(we wrote it…)

Article

A good introductory article by Erika Jonietz in Nature (for a fee)

Article

A fairly comprehensive presentation on the relationship between Physical Sciences and Oncology on the AACR site

Folder

Literature

   The link between the ECM and the nucleus

Wang N, Tytell JD, & Ingber DE

Mechanotransduction at a distance: mechanically coupling the extracellular matrix with the nucleus.

Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology volume 10, 75–82 (2009)

nature.com

   In Vitro

Matthew J Paszek, Nastaran Zahir, Kandice R Johnson et al.

Tensional homeostasis and the malignant phenotype

Cancer Cell 2005, 8; 241-254

sciencedirect.com

Montel F, et al.

Stress clamp experiments on multicellular tumor spheroids.

Phys Rev Lett 107(18): 188102. (2011)

journals.aps.org

G Cheng et al.

Micro-Environnental Mechanical Stress Controls Tumor Spheroid Size and Morphology by Suppressing Proliferation and Inducing Apoptosis in Cancer Cells.

PloS One 4(2) (2009)

journals.plos.org

   Ex Vivo

Plodinec M, et al.

The nanomechanical signature of breast cancer.

Nat Nanotechnol 7(11): 757-765. (2012)

nature.com

   Thermodynamics

EJ Mah, AF Yee, MA Digman

Metabolism Modulation of Cancer Cells on Varying Substrate Stiffnesses

Biophysical Journal, 2018

cell.com

   Reversion

Benjamin L Ricca et al

Transient external force induces phenotypic reversion of malignant epithelial structures via nitric oxide signaling

eLife, 2018

elifesciences.org

   Interactions with genetics

J Werfel et al.

How Changes in Extracellullar Matrix Mechanics and Gene Expression Variability Might Combine to Drive Cancer Progression.

Plos One 8 (10) e76122 (2013)

journals.plos.org

   Synergy with Immunotherapy

Ayako Miyazawa et al.

Regulation of PD-L1 expression by matrix stiffness in lung cancer cells

Biochemical and biophysical research communications 495.3 (2018): 2344-2349.

sciencedirect.com

CELL CONTRAINT & CANCER
le Mas l’Hermite
331 chemin de la Poterie
f13280 Raphèle les Arles